Checking In and All Lives Matter

It is past time to include the black ones. Kat and I are still healthy, and still fearful.  Our campground has become a small town with perhaps 25% vacant sites on weekdays and at most 10% on weekends.  Many of the semi-permanent campers are from hotspots Florida or Texas, and most of the weekenders work […]

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Jesus Just Left Chicago

We’ll get to that in a moment.  We remain alive and well in our snug little Airstream campground in the Georgia mountains on the banks of the singing Chattahoochee River.  We are well, but this state is becoming a hotspot for C-19, thanks to our governor who reopened everything a day after Trump told him […]

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Update from the Top of Georgia

The Top of Georgia Airstream Park is becoming my old hometown a/k/a  Mooringsport, LA.  We have come to know several neighbors and maybe too well, but we all still try to do the social distancing thing. One of the first we came to know (Kat meets them; I am introduced later) was Laine and her […]

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Camping in a National Petri Dish

Georgia’s governor Brian Kemp puts on a daily warm-up act as a lead-in to Trump’s regular medical sitcom.  (Why are Republicans doing all they can to pre-empt actual news?  It must be because the real news is so bad.)  Anyway, on April 19, Kemp mused on camera that although risky, it might be good to […]

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Sheltering in Place

Two weeks ago we left a perfectly good campground in Carlos, Texas.  Why?  A central Texas summer is not something many people enjoy.  And things had become a bit dicey for full-time RVers.  The Corps of Engineers and BLM had just closed all their campgrounds and boondocking areas.  Many state parks had closings scheduled, “until […]

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Covid-19 Comes to Texas

As a rule Texans fear few things.  They respect funnel clouds and shotguns, and dread losing a football game to LSU or having a Democrat in the White House.  But the novel coronavirus has them sitting up, paying attention, and doing a lot of hand-washing, if not -wringing.  Yet as of March 7, 2020 the […]

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Magnolia Ridge Campground

Kat and I just spent four lovely days at this Corps of Engineers Park on the shores of B. A. Steinhagen Lake between Jasper and Woodville, Texas.  The sites are mostly well-spaced with 30 amps and water for the princely sum of $9 a night with your America the Beautiful card.  Nobody played loud music, […]

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I Did Our Tax Return … On Paper

  Thirty years ago, way, way back in my days as an Early Adopter, I paid $19 for a CD’s worth of TurboTax Premium, 1990.  Its ease of use just blew me away.   It knew the law, was a whiz at math, and spit out a beautiful printed return (e-filing was not yet a thang) […]

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I Believe the President

Marie Yovanovitch, our retired ambassador to Ukraine, wrote an excellent opinion piece published today in the Washington Post.  In it she spoke of the current peril to our democracy, and how “freedom isn’t free” and that it is not up to our military to keep us free from ourselves.  She says that if we all […]

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Bea Hate Me

I’m a Progessive.  Bea is a Republican.  She visits this blog for reasons unknown. Bea has posted a series of nasty comments about an earlier post, Impeachment and Mr. Rogers.  And  for lack of factual content in her comments, I consigned them to Trash. Bea was not pleased. Bea, every word I wrote in “Impeachment […]

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Museum of the American Indian

Months ago I wrote about three of the four museums we toured this summer in D.C.  I have fought writer’s block in my efforts to create something honest and interesting about the fairly new addition to The Smithsonians on Native Americans.  This morning I awakened from what the first Americans would describe as a “vision”, […]

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Walt’s Beach

I wrote this two years ago and somehow never posted it.  Better late than never? We are in Pensacola, camped within a mile or two of where we interred a bit of an old friend’s cremains.  Yesterday would have been his 74th birthday. Kat, the Magic Bugger, and I are two days into our scheduled […]

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Impeachment and Mr. Rogers

One of the best and worst aspects of retirement is that one has the time to spend a day or a week watching televised coverage of the Congressional Impeachment Inquiry.  Kat and I have seen at least 95% of the hearings of the Intelligence and Judiciary to date (Dec 6, 2019).  From everything that we […]

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The African American Culture and History Museum

This was the best attended of all the DC museums we visited, if you’re speaking of the audience being honored at that museum.  There were smiles everywhere and I do hope these kids leave feeling better about their chance of success in today’s world.  I am an old white guy and I will say this: […]

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Hurricane!

Back in June Kat ordered a replacement oven/range for Kat’s Cradle’s original.  Its grates were badly corroded, and the burners had grown new fire-spouting orifices here and there.  Plus the oven door is attached now by only one screw — the other recently lost its purchase.  The time had come to replace it.  On Labor […]

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Sarah Duke Gardens, Durham, NC

A cool front blew through town yesterday bringing rain, winds, and an overnight low of 62 degrees.  By Sunday the rain was over and conditions were perfect to take a short ride to visit Duke Gardens.  It was partly cloudy but Kat took some magnificent pictures.  Most of them were in the Asian Garden section […]

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National Gallery of Art

We and our kids visited the National Gallery of Art in December, 1993.  Congress was in recess and in those few days before Christmas, tourists were scarce and metered parking spots were plentiful.  We had a great trip!  We ended it up with an evening in Colonial Williamsburg — they put on a parade and […]

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Outdoor Sculpture Gardens in D.C.

(One of the perks of writing a blog that no one pays us a nickel to write is that we can damn well do what we want, when we want, and in What Order.  So my story of our DC trip will be published when the photos are edited.  And that means from end to […]

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Here’s Where We Have Been

30 years ago I tore some cartilage and eventually had arthroscopy to smooth it out. 15 years ago I first noticed pain climbing stairs. X-rays revealed bone on bone contact where cartilage should intercede: “The only solution for this is knee replacement. We should do it soon.” I had a wise internist who thought otherwise. […]

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Arnaud’s or Tujague’s?

After six Februarys of camping within 30 miles of the French Quarter, not to mention 15 years of working in walking distance of those 156 blocks, I have come to realize that Kat and I have not dined at some of the classic NOLA restaurants. Emeril’s and Prudhomme’s various locations blew in like hurricanes, only […]

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Fontainebleau, 2019

Kat the lady mayor, the cat Brunswick, and Jackson (me, myself, and I), just wound up our annual two week visit to Fontainebleau SP in Mandeville, LA.  Six years back this was our first experience living in 200 square feet, unless you count college dorms, where we did not live together, or even in the […]

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The Caravan

We are moving into the last days before our political Armageddon or Deliverance, alternate outcomes that will become clear perhaps as soon as the early hours of November 7.  Trump is poking his base with a stick and wooing the undecideds with fear and loathing of an immigrant invasion.  He is not only doing this […]

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Art Imitates Life

The Sunday funnies have been wonderful lately.  The one above recaps Kavanaugh’s second hearing by speculating on juvenile emotions that are not so unlikely.  The tiny selection following is a commentary on our misruled nation, and we mean it as a bugle call to all Americans who know we can do better than we are […]

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State of the Union

We are back in Campbellsville earning the bread to fund next year’s travels. While C’ville is a good town for diesel engine work or to get your trailer’s sofa re-upholstered, it does little to inspire the would-be writer. So I will fall back on the sorry lot that has become our body politic in the […]

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Hot Chicken at Cages Bend

We have not posted a blog in quite a while, being occupied with helping long-time friends clear out one of their dwellings for an imminent sale, and then with getting Kat’s Cradle shined up. You might ask “What mentally competent retiree moves furniture?” And “What kind of fool shines up a 20 year old mobile […]

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Mount Rushmore

Kat and I spent half of Independence Day Eve visiting the Four Presidents carved from a mountainside by Gutzon Borglum and a cast of hundreds. Unlike those working on the Crazy Horse monument who plan to need another century or two to complete that project, Gutzon’s Boyz knocked out Rushmore in only fourteen years. Those […]

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Crazy Horse in the Black Hills

Three generations of Polish Americans have been working together just north of Custer, SD, to blast and chip a mountainside into a monument to the spirit of the American Indian. They have turned this project into a lucrative family business, which incidentally is the American Way, if not the Native American way. In 1939 Chief […]

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Gambling with the Coeur d’Alenes

Five years ago when first we visited Idaho, Coeur d’Alene was a hoped-for destination but one we missed for lack of knowledge on how to find available campgrounds. This time we spent a few days in the area exploring from our base camp at the Coeur d’Alene Casino fifteen miles or so outside of town. […]

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Mount Rainier National Park

The first picture shown in each of our blogs, the one that precedes the main body of text, is known in WordPress circles as The Featured Image. This one, Mt. Rainier on a perfect summer day, is Kat’s photo of a postcard purchased in the park’s main Visitors Center. We saw the postcard, but throughout […]

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Olympic National Park

This national park features three different areas of interest, each separated by a drive of roughly two hours. Ruby Beach is in many ways a typical rugged Pacific coast shoreline with waves crashing against huge rocks of volcanic origin. But we have seen a dozen similar beaches in the past few weeks so we skipped […]

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Fort Stevens State Park

It’s a long, long drive from Netarts Bay to Olympic National Park, and do we ever dislike long pulls. Fort Stevens is a big, well-reviewed campground near Astoria, WA, halfway to Olympic, and it happened to have a four night opening in its newest loop, O, beginning the day we left Netarts Garden RV Camp. […]

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Note on Kat’s Photographs

Beginning with Cannon Beach and Crater Lake, once again you can enlarge the blog’s pictures with a quick left click.   Older posts (June 2016 to Cannon Beach)… not yet, maybe not ever, but as El Presidente Pelo Naranja so often says: “We’ll see.”

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Crater Lake

Kat, Bugger, and I embarked upon a two-night excursion to Crater Lake National Park, and it made such a powerful impression on the humans I just had to write this while it’s fresh. I came expecting to see the world’s bluest water – if the weather cooperated – and it did. We enjoyed near full […]

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Cannon Beach, Oregon

We took a 50 mile drive trip up OR-101 to see one of this state’s most famed beaches. The weather was perfect: sunny, almost warm, and with just a gentle breeze. Wildflowers were exploding; we saw flashy wild rhododendrons, gold and yellow California poppies, those bigger bluebonnet look-alikes called lupines, and the state flower the […]

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Sasquatch, No; Wolfman, Yes

I have the pictures and the ideas together for a post called Cannon Beach … but Billy Cannon died this morning, and I have been feeling guilty about by-passing Los Angeles (traffic is even less fun when you’re pulling a 4-ton trailer).  And I have not mentioned that northern Pacific coast creature known as Sasquatch.  […]

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Netarts Bay Garden RV Park, Oregon

Today we began our third week based in a nice little RV campground which offers an excellent deal for the month of May along with a nice bay view and all the conveniences of home here, or in Tillamook six miles away. We chose to stop for a while to let spring overtake us, to […]

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Oregon’s Pacific Coast Food

Kat and I love Gulf seafood.  What we have found from the Pacific has been nearly as good – those big Pacific oysters (the most common variety, and the species canned for refrigerator cases in most of the USA) are too metallic for my taste, fried or raw.  Baked with a sauce they are acceptable, […]

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Oregon’s Pacific Coast Highway

Redwoods National Park casts a mood along the lines of Mirkwood, the dark forest of J. R. R. Tolkien’s Hobbit trilogy, inhabited by giant spiders, overseen by the Eye of Sauron, home of Gollum, a land terrorized by the occasional raid of marauding Orcs.  It is damp, mossy, cool when not cold, and packed with […]

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Yosemite National Park

  As famed as this park is, we did not know it has a valley section open most of the year, and a higher section that’s closed most of the year.  Our visit took place April 13 and 14 and they hadn’t even run snowplows through the mountain passes.  So we missed Tuolumne Meadows at […]

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Sequoia National Park

It seems spring has finally overtaken us on our trek north.  Outside Sequoia National Park the redbuds are in full bloom, the lupines (which look just like tall bluebonnets) are out in force, and the hills are covered with dark golden flowers the locals know as California poppies.  But the ever vigilant Park Service is […]

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Bugger

Over the years I have enjoyed the company of several black cats.  The first was Jinx who mysteriously appeared at our backdoor in Mooringsport.  My mom liked cats and Dad tolerated them, outside.  He hated the idea of something that buried its poop jumping onto countertops or tables.  That’s understandable, but in my dotage I […]

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Grand Canyon, 2018

If you are thinking of visiting Grand Canyon National Park this year it may be too late. Kat and I camped at our favorite boondocking site on FR 302 just south of Tusayan the first week of April.  We built a campfire, poured the wine, and prepared dinner.  The next morning we savored coffee and […]

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National Parks: Petrified Forest and Painted Desert

You get two parks here for the price of one.  The desert is the northern half of the park; the stone forest is the southern.  Neither is exactly a national treasure, but both are interesting as well as auto accessible.  Right on the border between north and south stands a ’32 Studebaker marking the site […]

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Standin’ on a Corner in Winslow, Arizona

I am probably chronologically older than 90% of my fellow Americans, and therefore I expect you kids to have some familiarity with that fine 70’s classic rock band The Eagles.  C’mon, you hear them today on the radio, and even in WalMart!  Take It Easy is one of their most accessible hits, involving a young […]

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Homolovi Ruins, Winslow, AZ

After Santa Rosa we took two days to pull the Sled 350 miles to Bluewater State Park near Prewitt, NM.  This is another lovely NM state campground even if at 7,500’ elevation.  We haven’t grown our mountain lungs – that requires a month to six weeks – and it doesn’t take much exertion to wear […]

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Oh, the Places We’ve Seen

It’s been a mostly quiet winter but we have put some miles between Kat’s Cradle and south Louisiana.   Bret and Allison have a new baby, Will, so we camped outside Bryan, TX for three weeks.  We did what we could to make a good first impression on a kid who is yet too young to […]

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A Wonderful Online Newspaper

Life on the Blue Highways carries a cost to its authors.  We are homeless, as we no longer have a hometown nor a daily newspaper to land with a WHUMP outside our door.  This troubled me for the first four years of our odyssey, and then … WHUMP … an ad popped up in a […]

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A Modest Suggestion on Gun Violence

17 good people were killed Wednesday in Parkland, FL.  CNN reports that the town, the school, the survivors and their families have damn well had enough of “thoughts and prayers”.   That’s not a solution.  Neither is blaming mental illness.  Easy access to military grade weapons strikes me as part of the problem, but there is […]

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Evicted

Around 10:00 Saturday, our 10th morning at the Gulf Islands National Seashore campground, National Park Service rangers began knocking on doors bearing bad news:  everyone has to pack up and leave before 4:00 this afternoon.  The campground is closed indefinitely due to lack of funding.   Yes, Kat and I were evicted from our paid for […]

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